Callaway Plantation Tour

Callaway Plantation 2

Callaway Plantation is open for tours, and it’s a great way to spend some time near Washington, Ga.  What makes this unique?  Being able to see how the family’s fortunes grew over the years – starting out with a circa 1783 one room cabin, a 1790 Federal looking house, and finally the big plantation house.  And it’s unusual to see a brick plantation house here, this was actually completed after the Civil War, in about 1869.  This is a different branch of the Callaway Family that is well known around West Georgia – Callaway Gardens, and Hills & Dales Estate in LaGrange.

Upon arriving here, you go into the 1930s General Store (and yes, it looks like a 1930s general store inside, very cool!) – which is neat to take a look around and see what a store of the 1930s looked like.  And the plantation bell – it was used to signal mealtimes, births, deaths, and emergencies.

1930s General Store
1930s General Store

The tour begins in a 230 year old log cabin.  While the original family cabin burned, this one was moved from nearby and gives a good idea of what it was like back then.

c 1785 Log Cabin with sleeping loft
c 1785 Log Cabin with sleeping loft

Stepping into the cabin you get a sense of how people made things work in tight quarters.  The family was growing quickly, and built a larger home a few years later.  Here are a couple of pictures inside the cabin.

Inside the log cabin - view 1
Inside the log cabin – view 1
Another view inside the log cabin
Another view inside the log cabin

Around 1790, the family built a bigger house, that’s more of a Federal style house, just called the Grey House.  Quite a step up from the log cabin, it’s decorated with period furnishings.  The door to the attic has a cutout in on a bottom corner, this was for the cat to handle any mice up in the attic?  There was no Orkin Exterminating over 200 years ago!  Callaway Plantation grew and flourished during the period before the Civil War.  It continued to be passed down through the family for several generations until it was donated to the City of Washington.

Circa 1790 Grey House
Circa 1790 Grey House
Inside the Grey House
Inside the Grey House

The big house was actually completed just after the Civil War, around 1869.  Unusual given how this was such a tough time in Georgia, and unusual to see a big home built out of brick.  There’s no inside pictures allowed in the big house, but believe me when I say – it is really pretty, and still has some of the family’s original furnishings inside.  In here you get a chance to really learn about the family, how they traveled and even took some of their furniture with them with they visited people for a period of time!

The 1869 Big House!
Callaway Plantation Tour – 1869 Big House

That’s part of what makes this tour really special – I learned so much about the family, and daily life back in the 1800s on this tour.  The house shows how wealthy the family was, even being built with closets – pretty rare considering taxes were based on number of rooms, and a closet counted as a room.

Back of house and kitchen
Back of house and kitchen

Inside the kitchen are of this house it was fun to see some items, including what is thought to be an early 1900s version of a crock pot, and it has the biggest bread bowl I have ever seen.  I think it’s 5 or 6 feet long!

There are several other buildings to explore here after seeing the houses, including this beautiful one room school house.

One Room Schoolhouse
One Room Schoolhouse

Fun to poke around and see the barn, a blacksmith shop, and a couple of other buildings here.

Barn!
Barn!
More outside Callaway
More outside Callaway
Well.... :)
Well…. 🙂
Blacksmith
Blacksmith shop

All in all, Callaway Plantation Tour is absolutely worth it and an easy 2 hour ride from Atlanta.  You can get more information on visiting by clicking here.  There are 2 other house museums in Washington and over 100 antebellum homes in town, so you can definitely make a day out of visiting here!

Thanks for taking this Callaway Plantation Tour with me, really do appreciate you reading the blog!

 

4 Comments

  1. Hi there, You did a great job with the photos and commentary to go along with this historic place. It is a hidden jewel that any lovers of history will enjoy.

    However, this Callaway family IS the same as the Callaways in LaGrange, GA. John Callaway and his wife Bethany Arnold are buried here in Washington. They are the great-grandparents of Fuller E. Callaway of LaGrange and Callaway Gardens. John Callaway was the owner of the log cabin and the gray house. Yes, by the time the brick house was built, some of the Callaway cousins had moved to LaGrange and the brick house is not related to the Fuller Callaways, but the origins of this plantation and the family are the same.

    Here’s the familial line:

    John Callaway –> Enoch Callaway –> Abner Reeves Callaway –> Fuller E Callaway, Sr

  2. Another fun little tidbit- the reason the brick house was able to be built in 1869, after the Civil War- the Callaway cotton was on the last ship out of the Port of Savannah before the Yankees took it over. When it got to London, their cotton broker put the proceeds into British Pounds rather than Confederate dollars. (I love the stories behind the homes and the people who lived in them.)

    By the way– I LOVE your blog!! Thanks for the great job on sharing these great gems in Georgia.

    • I totally agree – the stories behind the people really brings these old homes to life. Thanks so much for sharing. And I am so glad you enjoy the blog!

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