Great Cottages and Bungalows

Candler Park Bungalow
Candler Park Bungalow

As much as I enjoy looking at the big old houses around Georgia, the cottage and bungalow is another form of house I really like.  And I’m a sucker for a great front porch!  Be it a raised cottage, craftsman bungalows, etc – I love the variety!  Here are some that I particularly enjoyed over the last few months, and several photos I haven’t had a chance to publish before.  It’s hard to find one particular style that I like best, I can appreciate them all.

Great front porch on this Greenville bungalow
Great front porch on this Greenville bungalow

Now the Victorian Cottage – and the many varieties of it, are always favorites to see.

Victorian in Washington, GA
Victorian in Washington, GA

Another great one in Candler Park, check out that porch.  So much potential here.

Check out that porch!
Check out that porch!
Raised cottage style near Eatonton
Raised cottage style near Eatonton

Even famous cottages, like FDR’s Little White House at Warm Springs are a treat to see.  You can check out the previous post on this for a full tour of the property and grounds.

Little White House in Warm Springs
Little White House in Warm Springs

Circa 1840
Circa 1840 in Madison, GA

And of course summertime means beach time for many folks, and the beach cottage style is always a favorite!

Tybee Island
Tybee Island
This may be my favorite beach cottage ever...
This may be my favorite beach cottage ever…

The variety of old cottages and bungalows around Georgia is just amazing.

Now that's a serious front porch!
Now that’s a serious front porch!
Great Victorian Cottage in Madison
Great Victorian Cottage in Madison

One of the trends in the 1920s-1940s was to build much smaller homes than in the past.  The Tudor style cottage below isn’t large, but has some big curb appeal!

Tudor Cottage near Emory University
Tudor Cottage near Emory University

Hope you enjoyed taking a look at some different bungalows and cottages that I’ve seen around Georgia.  Thanks so much for checking out the site – I appreciate it!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Druid Hills – Favorite Homes

Ivy covered house in Druid Hills

Druid Hills is one of my favorite neighborhoods in Atlanta, with big lots and mature landscaping.  The variety of homes makes it a great area to walk around, you just never know what type of historic home you will see next!  A lot of folks immediately think of “Driving Miss Daisy” since it was based on Druid Hills, and there’s a post about those homes here that you can take a look at. So much variety of styles, from the ivy-covered home above, to several Mediterranean Revival and Tudor homes.  A couple of these are not level, that’s what happens when you try to walk the dog and take a few pictures!

Deepdene Park Home

You don’t see a lot of Mediterranean homes around Atlanta, but there are a few when this style was very popular in the 1920s, during the Florida land boom.  I love the gate to the garden off to the left on this one.

Mediterranean in Druid Hills

There are some big lots throughout Druid Hills, and combine that with nearly 100 year old landscaping, some houses are a little hard to view, like this one sitting a long way from the road.

Mediterranean Revival along Shadyside Park

Several well-known architects designed homes throughout Druid Hills, and this 2 story traditional was designed by the firm of Ivey & Crook in 1929 for John Howard Candler.  He was the grandson of Coca-Cola founder Asa Griggs Candler.

1929 Designed by Ivey and Crook Architects

The house below is a great example of recycling!  It was designed by Owen James Southwell for Isaac S Hopkins, an Atlanta attorney.  Parts of this house were salvaged when the former Georgia Governor’s Mansion was demolished in 1923.  The old Governor’s mansion had housed Georgia’s governors for about 50 years, and was torn down to make way for the Henry Grady Hotel, which was later torn down to build the landmark Westin hotel downtown.  The marble columns, ironwork and some other elements were salvaged and made part of the design of this house.

Salvaged columns and iron from old Governors mansion

Close up of salvaged columns

Speaking of the variety of homes, there are many variations of traditional homes as you continue to walk thru Druid Hills.  Here are a few more I always enjoy seeing on my walks.

Stucco Druid Hills

Hilltop House in Druid Hills

Shingled House in Druid Hills

Another Druid Hills beauty

Tudor House Druid Hills

Another Tudor in Druid Hills

Great landscaping and house

 Thanks so much for taking a look around at some of my favorite homes in Druid Hills!  I appreciate it!

Callaway Plantation Tour

Callaway Plantation 2

Callaway Plantation is open for tours, and it’s a great way to spend some time near Washington, Ga.  What makes this unique?  Being able to see how the family’s fortunes grew over the years – starting out with a circa 1783 one room cabin, a 1790 Federal looking house, and finally the big plantation house.  And it’s unusual to see a brick plantation house here, this was actually completed after the Civil War, in about 1869.  This is a different branch of the Callaway Family that is well known around West Georgia – Callaway Gardens, and Hills & Dales Estate in LaGrange.

Upon arriving here, you go into the 1930s General Store (and yes, it looks like a 1930s general store inside, very cool!) – which is neat to take a look around and see what a store of the 1930s looked like.  And the plantation bell – it was used to signal mealtimes, births, deaths, and emergencies.

1930s General Store
1930s General Store

The tour begins in a 230 year old log cabin.  While the original family cabin burned, this one was moved from nearby and gives a good idea of what it was like back then.

c 1785 Log Cabin with sleeping loft
c 1785 Log Cabin with sleeping loft

Stepping into the cabin you get a sense of how people made things work in tight quarters.  The family was growing quickly, and built a larger home a few years later.  Here are a couple of pictures inside the cabin.

Inside the log cabin - view 1
Inside the log cabin – view 1
Another view inside the log cabin
Another view inside the log cabin

Around 1790, the family built a bigger house, that’s more of a Federal style house, just called the Grey House.  Quite a step up from the log cabin, it’s decorated with period furnishings.  The door to the attic has a cutout in on a bottom corner, this was for the cat to handle any mice up in the attic?  There was no Orkin Exterminating over 200 years ago!  Callaway Plantation grew and flourished during the period before the Civil War.  It continued to be passed down through the family for several generations until it was donated to the City of Washington.

Circa 1790 Grey House
Circa 1790 Grey House
Inside the Grey House
Inside the Grey House

The big house was actually completed just after the Civil War, around 1869.  Unusual given how this was such a tough time in Georgia, and unusual to see a big home built out of brick.  There’s no inside pictures allowed in the big house, but believe me when I say – it is really pretty, and still has some of the family’s original furnishings inside.  In here you get a chance to really learn about the family, how they traveled and even took some of their furniture with them with they visited people for a period of time!

The 1869 Big House!
Callaway Plantation Tour – 1869 Big House

That’s part of what makes this tour really special – I learned so much about the family, and daily life back in the 1800s on this tour.  The house shows how wealthy the family was, even being built with closets – pretty rare considering taxes were based on number of rooms, and a closet counted as a room.

Back of house and kitchen
Back of house and kitchen

Inside the kitchen are of this house it was fun to see some items, including what is thought to be an early 1900s version of a crock pot, and it has the biggest bread bowl I have ever seen.  I think it’s 5 or 6 feet long!

There are several other buildings to explore here after seeing the houses, including this beautiful one room school house.

One Room Schoolhouse
One Room Schoolhouse

Fun to poke around and see the barn, a blacksmith shop, and a couple of other buildings here.

Barn!
Barn!
More outside Callaway
More outside Callaway
Well.... :)
Well…. 🙂
Blacksmith
Blacksmith shop

All in all, Callaway Plantation Tour is absolutely worth it and an easy 2 hour ride from Atlanta.  You can get more information on visiting by clicking here.  There are 2 other house museums in Washington and over 100 antebellum homes in town, so you can definitely make a day out of visiting here!

Thanks for taking this Callaway Plantation Tour with me, really do appreciate you reading the blog!

 

Greenville – Favorite Homes

Greenville, GA –  Had the chance to visit Greenville, GA this weekend. It’s the county seat of Meriwether County, about 55 miles southwest of Atlanta.  Greenville is a small town, with a population of about 950.  And quite a few  historic homes on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Warner-Hill-Clark House, pictured below is on the National Register.  This is actually 2 single story houses put together!  Originally built in 1836, another was added to the house to create the second story in 1869.  There’s a little bit of difference in the wood between the first and second floor, since they were originally two different houses.  Even better, it’s for sale and there are quite a few pictures of the interior you can see here.

Warner Hill Clark House

Not too far down the road is another one of my favorites, the Burwell O. Hill House with imposing columns below.  The story on this house – it was originally built in 1893 as a Victorian Style house.  This was towards the very end of the Victorian Era.  In 1909, there was a major renovation of the house to make the exterior of it look like the then-trendy Classic Revival style.  The inside remained Victorian.  Pretty cool, huh?

Burwell O Hill House

This blue house, it’s just fantastic!  Everything about it, what a great house!!  This could be called Gothic Revival or Victorian Gothic. I just call it fantastic!  I want to move into this today.

Greenville 1

Couldn’t get a good picture of the one below, but you can see it sure does look like it’s kin to the blue house above!

Greenville 5

With Greenville being pretty small, you can easily cover a lot of town on foot here.  And there were quite a few homes for sale here. Walking around you realize too how hilly this area of western Georgia is.  This 1910 home is way up a hill and it’s for sale!  There are some interior pictures you can see here.  Like the woodwork in the main hall and the stained glass windows.

Hilltop

I was pleased to find some great bungalows around town, this one just ended up my favorite.  The front porch – just love it.

Bungalow

Also really liked some of the details on this bungalow.  The porch! I enjoy big houses and columns, but also really enjoy the ease of a one story house.

Greenville Blue

Now this one has some great details and is sporting a great paint job. And that porch!  It too is listed for sale at $159K.

For Sale Greenville

Lots of the old south style homes here, this one has columns and an upstairs porch – unusual to see this. The rocking chairs look great here too!

2 story Porch

And here’s one last one I really liked in Greenville – and hey it’s for sale too!

Greenville 8

Naturally walking around made me hungry (OK, what doesn’t make me hungry? HA!).  The Court Square Café, right on the square has some really good food!  Their website can be found here.  The Pimento Cheeseburger was really good.

Thanks so much for touring some favorite homes in Greenville!  Appreciate you reading the blog!

 

Stately Oaks Plantation near Atlanta, Georgia

Stately Oaks Plantation
Getting ready to tour the big house!

Stately Oaks Plantation is located in Jonesboro, just a few minutes away from Atlanta. This antebellum home was built around 1839 and it’s open to the public for tours. Back around 1860, this was the center of a 400 acre plantation.

If you go on a Saturday, your guides are dressed up in antebellum clothing (how did folks wear that many layers in the summer before air conditioning?).  As the guides take you through the big house, you learn so much about daily life in the period before the Civil War.

The house has been moved from it’s original location, which was about 4 miles north of Jonesboro.  It’s definitely seen it’s fair share of history since 1840, there were even Union Soldiers camped in the front yard during the Battle of Atlanta in 1864.  Jonesboro is Gone With The Wind country, as this is the setting for the fictional Tara Plantation.  We saw the movie set for Tara a while back, you can click here for that post.

To tour Stately Oaks, you stop first to buy your ticket on the property at Juddy’s Country Store.  I loved this old country store!  So many cool things in here, it was probably good the tour was about to start or I would have had to buy stuff!

Juddy's Country Store on the grounds of Stately Oaks
Juddy’s Country Store on the grounds of Stately Oaks

Stately Oaks Plantation is also known as The Orr House, Robert McCord House, and The Oaks.  The house was moved to it’s current location in 1972, and there was some vandalism prior to it being restored.  Here’s a picture from 1974 of this house (from NRHP).

Boarded Up and Awaiting Restoration
Boarded Up and Awaiting Restoration

The interior of the house – it’s 4 rooms over 4 rooms, and the hallway is about 10 feet wide.  I spy a vintage refrigerator off in the distance of the hallway picture below.

Interior of Stately Oaks, circa 1974.
Interior of Stately Oaks, circa 1974.
Another view from the 1970s
Another view from the 1970s

Can’t take pictures inside the big house, but there are several interesting buildings right around the house to check out – had no idea how many other buildings were here!  They have moved and preserved other buildings from throughout Clayton County to the site, which really made for an interesting visit.

This is the original kitchen house to Stately Oaks, they used to put mud in between the beams to keep it warmer in the winter, then remove that in the summer to allow for ventilation – always learn things checking out old houses!

Original Kitchen for Stately Oaks
Original Kitchen for Stately Oaks

Going inside the kitchen, you can’t help but notice the fireplace in here – imagine how many meals were cooked in here!  It was HOT the day I toured here, and I can’t imagine how hot it must have gotten in this building!

Inside Kitchen
Inside Kitchen
Kitchen Working Area
Kitchen Working Area

Another building that was interesting to see was a Sharecropper’s Cabin.  Big change from touring Stately Oaks Plantation big house!  Now, they call it a tenant cabin – and that does sound nicer, but it’s a Sharecropper cabin to me.  Interesting looking in here realizing how small this living space is.

Sharecropper Cabin
Sharecropper Cabin
Inside the Sharecropper Cabin
Inside the Sharecropper Cabin

There were quite a few other buildings to see, including the Bethel School that was relocated here.  Walking in here it was so fun looking around a turn of the century one-room school!

Inside Bethel School
Inside Bethel School

There’s even a blacksmith shop and barn here that I had to take a look at.

Barn
Barn

There’s even several Creek Indian buildings that have been recreated here.  I managed to embarrass myself inside one of these Creek Indian spots, walked into a darkened hut and was looking around –  a frog jumped right beside my foot and I calmly nearly jumped out of my skin.

Creek Indian Hut, complete with frogs in there!
Creek Indian Hut, complete with frogs in there!

This is one really interesting place to get to tour, and for those in Atlanta, it’s one of the closest plantations you can go and tour.  Hope you enjoyed taking a look around Stately Oaks Plantation.  This is run by Historical Jonesboro, and have included their link here for all the details about visiting them.

Stately Oaks Plantation
Stately Oaks Plantation

 

Thanks so much for reading the blog, I really appreciate it!